Jump to content

Turkey


[TNT] Sonic Goo
 Share

Recommended Posts

One of the big issues in Europe is Turkey becoming part of the EU. There's a number of issues people are concerned about:

 

Economic issues

There are a lot of Turks already living in Europe, and they're often seen as taking other people's jobs (or, if they're unemployed, lazy bastards taking your money). People are worried they might see more people coming over here. On the other hand, Turkey has a relatively young population, which could counter the aging problems in Europe, and a good entrepreneurial culture. There's also the worry that this might come too soon after the joining of ten Eastern European countries and that we should wait until after they are sufficiently integrated for any new candidates to join.

 

Religious issues

If you're looking for a more modern, moderate version of Islam, more in sync with Western values, Turkey would be a good place to start. (The legacy of Ataturk.) Though the democratic demands of joining the EU could weaken the army's influenc on politics and strengthen that of the religious parties.

 

Political issues

Before joining Europe the issue of Cyprus would have to be resolved. It's not certain whether they'll be able to do this. Then there is the Kurdish issue. There are fears that Turkey might interfere if the Iraqi Kurds would get too much independence, since it could encourage Turkish Kurds to demand the same. A Turkey about to enter the EU would be less likely to do such a thing.

 

So what do you think, Turkey, yes or no? Now or later?

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Maybe you could list the criteria that countries have to meet to even be considered a member of the EU. It might be helpful for debate if we knew where the EU council stood on each of the criteria i.e. do they feel all the official requirements have been met.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

They're called the Copenhagen Criteria. Excerpt from the Copenhagen Presidency conclusions:

 

"Membership requires that the candidate country has achieved stability of institutions guaranteeing democracy, the rule of law, human rights and respect for and, protection of minorities, the existence of a functioning market economy as well as the capacity to cope with competitive pressure and market forces within the Union. Membership presupposes the candidate's ability to take on the obligations of membership including adherence to the aims of political, economic and monetary union."
(from the link above)
Link to comment
Share on other sites

human rights and respect for and, protection of minorities

 

Kurds are a sizeable minority in Turkey and are also massed right over the border as we know in Norther Iraq.

 

Adding Turkey to the European Union would force profitable Europe to take on another s--- economy, as well as in crease the chances of easy access to Islamic terrorists wishing to do them harm.

 

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The prospect of entering the EU has already made Turkey go easier on the Kurds. Saying no or even postponing entry could cause that progress to be lost again. And, as mentioned, Turkey produces very few fundamentalist terrorists.

 

As for the economy, its GDP grew 8,2% last year. That's not bad. Like the Eastern European countries, it's seen as a country with lots of potential. Combined with the restraints of the EU rules and profiting from the open borders that should make for some solid long term economic growth.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Sonic Goo,Aug 27 2005, 09:46 AM]The prospect of entering the EU has already made Turkey go easier on the Kurds. Saying no or even postponing entry could cause that progress to be lost again.  And, as mentioned, Turkey produces very few fundamentalist terrorists.

13196[/snapback]

 

 

That begs the question of whether they can sustain progress or if it is all a show just to get through the front door. If their motives are true, they should be able to sustain progress, or at the very least maintain their current level of progress, should the vote be no.

 

Turkey has also been a quasi safe haven for terrorists.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

The people of Turkey are moving inextricably towards the western way of life, it will only be a matter of time before they are accepted.

With the problems of Western v Middle East ways of life, the "gateway to the east" will be a useful asset in the EU............once Turkey meet the joining criteria of course. I say roll on the day...........

Link to comment
Share on other sites

UE is at the beginning something economics started together between Benelux, France, Germany and Italia... then we growed up to take Spain, Portugal, UK, Irl, Sweden and Finland. All those countries had the same history even if we fighted against each others.

Turkey is far from those stories and we just get 10 new countries + 2 with Bulgaria and Romania.

 

Do UE need time to accept the 10 former east countries ? Yes

 

Are we ready to have in UE a non-"christian" country ? I doubt that

 

Do people want turkeys to go to their country ? I doubt again.

 

The "no" to turkey is at the moment about economics issue because the UE membership is only regarding that. but we can't say that Turkey can be viewed like Croatia who may enter in UE sooner.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Guest AngelEyes

No turkey in my european continent as long as the middle east isnt stable....

 

Right now.. not many terrorists produced by turkey

 

When the gateway towards europe opens in turkey... the counter will go ++++++++

Link to comment
Share on other sites

There's absolutely no link between the two. You don't chose to train terrorists in a country because it's easier to cross its borders than others, thanks God. You'd pick a country with few police forces (it's not the case in Turkey), big desertic or semi-desertic areas to install bases (not the case either), and a good proportion of islamic fanatics in the population (nope, not really the case), like for example Egypt, Irak, Algeria, etc. As for the "gates" not being already open anyway, you're wrong. If terrorists wanted to cross our borders, they could do it exactly the way workers do, since we got all they need in London, Paris, or anywahere else to make bombs. They won't have to bring the chemistry lab with them. Hey, AE, terrorists don't have special visas, they're NORMAL people. They can cross borders like you and I. Check at the nearest airport, there are security measures, but you'll never see a big sign saying "TERRORISTS, FOLLOW THE RED LINE".

 

Contrary to what you say, the european police could control Eastern Turkey better if the country was part of the EU, for example. Terrorism or potential extension of the middle-eastern problems are not really big issues in Turkey. It's a more general cultural and religious problem, I think. At least for most of the people who examined the turkish situation closely.

Link to comment
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

 Share

×
×
  • Create New...

Important Information

By using this site, you agree to our Guidelines Privacy Policy.