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[TNT] Sonic Goo

Ask a Dutchy!

22 posts in this topic

I've seen this sort of topic elsewhere and thought it might be a good idea here. If there's anything you'd like to know about Dutch culture, politics, food or whatever else, just ask!

 

polder.jpg

 

netherlands_leiden_01.jpg

 

 

(I might be able to talk a bit about Irish stuff as well, until we can get Cel to make a similar topic, of course :) )

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Is it true that the Dutch have no sense of humor? During WWII Americans soldiers were instructed not to tell jokes to the Dutch, as "they wouldn't appreciate it".

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Holland is a fine country. I've had the pleasure to have been on a few occassions.

 

Tallest people on average of any Nation.

Only country to have a "National Dog".

 

Mr. Goo, how about explaining the difference between the term "Netherlands" and "Holland"?

Any good story you have about dykes would also be appreciated :).

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Ooooh excellent thread ^^

Yea dutchies are tall... lol... Im 1.91m

 

Holland is actually a part of the Netherlands. There are 2 regions called North and south Holland. The yellow part is holland :)

 

holland.gif

 

Lol a good story about dykes... There has been crisis in 1953 when some dykes couldnt hold the sea... You can read about that, here http://www.minbuza.nl/history/en/1953

 

I love holland! lol :)

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I see Sander stole my thunder already... :aaevil:

 

Though I might elaborate a bit when it comes to names. There is also the expression Lowlands, which includes both the Netherlands and Belgium (though I believe Les Pais Bas refers to the Netherlands only) and the Benelux is of course Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxemburg. The official name of The Netherlands, by the way, is The Kingdom of The Netherlands and Oversees Territories, since we still have a few colonies left.

 

Is it true that the Dutch have no sense of humor?

 

I advise you learn the language and check out a thing we call Cabaret (which is a bit different than other uses of the word abroad). It's a bit like standup comedy, but these are longer shows which often have a story arc, songs and can even use a stage set to comedic effect. Whereas standup comedy tends to favour basic jokes or even oneliners purely for entertainment value, cabaret is often full of engagement, tackeling subjects socially relevant to society. 'Kicking over holy houses', we call it. This is often done by means of very harsh and black humour. Much of this humour, however, is language or cultural reference-based, so will be hard for foreigners to get, which might explain your misconception.

 

And, eh, we have a national dog? The Dutch heraldic animal is the lion:

 

148.jpg

 

Googling for national dogs yields a Kanaan Dog for Isreal and a naked national dog for Mexico, but not Dutch dogs... Am I missing something?

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I see Sander stole my thunder already... :aaevil:

 

Though I might elaborate a bit when it comes to names. There is also the expression Lowlands, which includes both the Netherlands and Belgium (though I believe Les Pais Bas refers to the Netherlands only) and the Benelux is of course Belgium, The Netherlands and Luxemburg. The official name of The Netherlands, by the way, is The Kingdom of The Netherlands and Oversees Territories, since we still have a few colonies left.

I advise you learn the language and check out a thing we call Cabaret (which is a bit different than other uses of the word abroad). It's a bit like standup comedy, but these are longer shows which often have a story arc, songs and can even use a stage set to comedic effect. Whereas standup comedy tends to favour basic jokes or even oneliners purely for entertainment value, cabaret is often full of engagement, tackeling subjects socially relevant to society. 'Kicking over holy houses', we call it. This is often done by means of very harsh and black humour. Much of this humour, however, is language or cultural reference-based, so will be hard for foreigners to get, which might explain your misconception.

 

And, eh, we have a national dog? The Dutch heraldic animal is the lion:

 

148.jpg

 

Googling for national dogs yields a Kanaan Dog for Isreal and a naked national dog for Mexico, but not Dutch dogs... Am I missing something?

 

Yep, ya gotta national pooch...

 

http://www.keeshondcountry.com/History.htm

 

My memories of Holland revolve around...

 

1) hot chicks in der Haague. Holy crap, nothing like looking at a tall blonde eye to eye.

2) Shite weather

3) Trying raw herring from a street vendor (not bad I must say)

4) Thatched roofs even on the most expensive houses in Wassenar where I was staying.

5) Friendly people

6) taking a train and noticing out the window a boat sailing ABOVE me.

7) A strong belief in the evils of heating the house properly.

8) Taking about a week to learn to "correctly" say Leens, recht, and recht door. (I know I spelled them wrong. Spelling them correctly would have taken another week).

 

Acutually reading the book now "Infidel", or which much takes place in Holland.

Facinating novel, which I recomend...

51J59V2399L._SS500_.jpg

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Hmm... I can't think of a translation of Keeshond, so there might be some truth to it.

 

So that's what people in Wassenaar talk about, eh? To quote a former classmate of mine, 'Zodra wij in Aerdenhout een zachte g horen, grijpen wij het jachtgeweer'. ('As soon as we hear a soft g in Aerdenhout*, we grab the hunting rifle.')

 

And of all the centuries of great Dutch literature you pick that one? Oy...

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Aerdenhout being a similar place to Wassenaar, Bloemendaal, etc.

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LOL thatched roofs are THE thing to have on the most expencive houses! lol! Its stylish! :)

 

The weather can be fine here too :) Cool summers and warm winters, I like that :)

 

Ah and yea, its links rechts and rechtdoor ^^ (left, right and straight on) haha ;) I know people have a lot of difficulties with pronouncing dutch hehe :)

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And, if you're German, 'Immer erade aus'! :P

 

My Father has a Dutch friend who lives in Abcoude (sp?) who was actually a pow during WW2. He used to say that the Dutch resistance would ask new resistance fighters to prenounce certain Dutch words, from which they would easily detect if they were German infiltrators or not.

 

Regarding Wassenar. It is a beautiful neighborhood. I mention the thatch roofs, as my friend and I were setting off fireworks to celebrate New Years, and his father was reminding us to be carefull as if one of our bottle rockets landed on a roof....FOOOOOM. Break out the Marshmellows.

 

I am well aware of the many famous dutch writers over the years. My mother is a professional artist, so she drilled into me as a child all the various styes including Rembrandt, Vermeer, etc.

 

I speak of this book as it shows much of the imigration laws in Holland in the early 90's, and how they dealt with this first rush of refugees, and other seeking asylum in Western Europe at that time.

 

More contemporary for the kids at home you see :).

 

 

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Yes, it's common knowledge that they used words like 'Scheveningen' as passwords, since pretty much anyone from anywhere outside The Netherlands has a problem with things like the 'sch' sound.

 

Rembrandt and Vermeer were painters. Now pay attention to what your mother says or no dessert for you!

 

Hirsi Ali might be contemporary, she's also a bit of an extremist and a political poo trap in Holland. So I'd take anything in that book with a grain of salt, at least.

Edited by [TNT] Sonic Goo

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Yeah that was the word that he mentioned.

 

Yes I know they are artists. I was meaning to suggest all the artisans of the day, whether literary or art in the case of what was drilled into by my mother... "Adam, notice the heavy brown and darker red tones specific to the style of Rembrandt".

 

As far as her book is concerned, until my Peter Stuyvesant tell all comes in from Amazon, it will have to do :P.

 

Btw, I bought this 2 months ago. Started to work on it, sprained my mouth on one of your words, and have not tried since.

Maybe will give her another dance...

 

http://www.amazon.com/Yourself-Complete-Pa...s/dp/0071413863

 

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A tulpebol is a tulip bulb;

 

1163005895_0371.jpg

 

the tulip being considered a typically Dutch flower, despite the fact that it's not originally Dutch.

 

 

Holland is a relatively expensive place to live. Not as expensive as places like Japan, for example, but up there. (For Americans, the current exchange rates would add to that, of course.) Though you do get excellent public services, like public transport (trams!), good quality roads, power, broadband/phone lines, etc. in return. It's all very well organised. Going from there to Ireland is like going ten years back in time.

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How much does 1 tulip costs there? :huh: And I am being serious.

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Who are the Real "CheeseHeads?", the Dutch or the Green Bay Packer fans?

 

165679194_cba148cbe3.jpg

 

Vs.

 

cheesehead.jpg

 

 

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METAL: the price of tulips depends on what kind you buy and where. You can find some prices here.

 

KNIX: I can't seem to find an exact etymology for kaaskop, but it's most famous as a term the Belgians use for the Dutch (the latter being famous for their cheeses). The American version of that seems to be 'yankee' rather than 'cheesehead', which according to some comes from Jan Kees or Jan Kaas. Kaas is Dutch for cheese.

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My Father has a Dutch friend who lives in Abcoude (sp?) who was actually a pow during WW2. He used to say that the Dutch resistance would ask new resistance fighters to prenounce certain Dutch words, from which they would easily detect if they were German infiltrators or not.

 

 

Shibboleth

 

And don't say Gesundheit !

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