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Transgendered teach to go back to teaching


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I understand he/she needs the money, but find a job away from the kids. If the school board wants to hire him/her, maybe an admin type job would be better placement. Just plain ridiculous to move him/her back in with the kids.

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I understands he/she needs the money, but find a job away from the kids. If the school board wants to hire him/her, maybe an admin type job would be better placement. Just plain ridiculous to move him/her back in with the kids.

 

 

Uh oh, Daybreak's not gonna like this!

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Independent' date='Feb 28 2006, 02:32 PM' post='34217']

Uh oh, Daybreak's not gonna like this!

When it comes to my kids (assuming my kids were in that class), I really don't give a flying rats azz what Daybreak likes ;)

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Well, good to know that everyone knows what I'm going to say.....

 

For a bit of background. From what I've studied, Gender Identity Disorder is very real and can be very heart-breaking. Those that suffer from it do not wish to have it nor do they wish it on others. Treatment options include therapy in order for the individual to become more comfortable with their biological gender or sex reassignment surgery. In psychological terms, gender is what's in your mind, not your body. If this individual meets the DSM IV criteria for GID or even if he doesn't, I would be inclined to believe someone if they felt that they were born in the wrong body.

 

From what it sounds like in the forum, the issue is the children. The newly dubbed Ms. McBeth is a grown-up, and she is fully aware that a large number of parents and students will not be comfortable with the issue. Presumably she was rehired by the school because it was the right thing to do. There was no particular reason not to rehire Ms. McBeth other than the notion that some people might be uncomfortable with the idea of changing one's gender. Do I think that the children will be negatively affected by Ms. McBeth's gender change?--->I don't at all. As long as it's explained to them in whatever appropriate amount of detail is saw fit, then they'll be just fine. Ms. McBeth is not the first and certainly won't be the last person to feel that they were born in the wrong body. It has nothing to do with homosexuality...and in actuality, the vast majority of men who cross-dress for sexual reasons are straight and do not have gender identity disorder.

 

Is the situation bizarre?--->sure

 

Is it okay to be uncomfortable with the notion of changing one's gender through surgery?--->of course it is

 

The moral of the story is to get the facts, some people feel like they were born in the wrong body and the vast majority of people do not. A teacher changed his gender, so what.

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The moral of the story is to get the facts, some people feel like they were born in the wrong body and the vast majority of people do not. A teacher changed his gender, so what.

So What? You make it sound so nonchalant - like he just decided to change the color of his hair or decided to become a vegetarian after a lifetime of being an omnivore. There are clearly some psychological issues going on here and as such, children do not need to be exposed to it.

 

Presumably she was rehired by the school because it was the right thing to do.

No, presumably she was hired by the school because they were scared of the legal ramifications of not hiring her. The 'right thing to do' would have been to listen to the parents of the children whom she would be around. I find it disgusting, yet predictable, that you view the school boards actions as 'the right thing to do' - almost as if they would know better than the parents what's best for their children.

 

Again, I 'm not denying her a job. My point is, put her in a different environment (maybe admin) where she is not around children.

 

 

And I'm not sure what facts you are referring to in the moral of your story....I hope you're not reffering to the "facts" about transgender psychology you posted above. IMHO, Psychology is far from being a fact filled science - ask anyone who actually practices it how many times what used to be psychology "facts" really turned out to be psychology interpretation. When kids are involved, it's not acceptable to assume everything will be ok only to find out that, once again Psychologists were wrong and that the 'facts" have changed again.

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Well, the 'facts' I was referring to includes the notion that Gender Identity Disorder does indeed occur. My preliminary research shows that it is somewhat rare. I can't research a paper on the subject just for this forum, however I will research it in greater detail at a later time in my schooling.

 

RXS, you're concerned about the children, which is perfectly fair and understandable. We tend to fear that which we don't understand. I suppose my question is 'what are you afraid of'? What do you think is going to happen with regards to the children? Like I said, I think it's perfectly understandable to be uncomfortable with this issue and even though Ms. McBeth managed to get rehired, she was being somewhat naive if she had expected to be rehired when she sought to do so. I make this issue sound nonchalant because I feel like it should be a non-issue. It could be argued that the parents are the ones making it an issue.

 

Is psychology perfect--->of course not, but you're coming from a place of fear and pure emotion. Psychologists know more than you do about this disorder which is again, not the issue. You have your opinion and I have mine. This is life, we have to deal with certain things. My position is that the children will learn something new from this teacher. And if by the slim chance one or more of the children feels like they are afflicted with Gender Identity Disorder someday, they will have more information about it. Ms. McBeth didn't do anything wrong, she didn't intend to hurt anyone, she just wants to live her life in a way that makes sense to her. In this society, it seems to me that we try to hide things from our children as much as possible, and at some point, it becomes a problem rather than a protective approach. Why can't it be explained to the children that Ms. McBeth was not happy as a man, the feeling he had inside him is very rare, and he decided to do something about it? Kids have to eventually learn about death, sexuality, the fact that their parents aren't perfect, drugs, alcohol, their own sexual identity, and so on.

 

Again, you're not telling me anything except that you are uncomfortable with the idea of a sex change, that doesn't mean anything to me and it's certainly not something that I can argue with.

 

Of all the things children have to deal with when they grow up, they learned that their substitute teacher is happier with a different gender role...so what?

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Oh, OK, that's where I was confused...those 'facts' you pointed out were never in question.

 

Your comments hint that I am a TG-phobe....this is not true. I know several and am friends with a couple. My concern is much deeper than that. It is not based solely on 'fear and emotions' as you suggest. Quite contrary.

 

Actualy, perhaps I mispoke. One of my fears is that psychologists think they understand what goes on in these people's heads and that they can slap a lable on it as being benign - just as you just did. (Just like they do with regards to labeling reformed sexual predators as benign)

 

Someone who decides to undergo a sex change this late in the game is not what society defines as normal.

 

What happens when a child asks in depth questions as to 'what exactly was changed'...can we assume that the teacher will not start a "sex ed" class and discuss sensitive material? I don't want to put my children in a position where that could happen. What if this sex change is because of some type of psychological trauma? Could a snide comment or maybe a joke set this person off? These are just a couple examples of several.

 

It's not really a matter of hiding things from our children, but rather exposing them to at the appropriate time as dictated by the parents not the school board or Mc Beth. This is why we have age laws on viewing pornography, drinking beer, using tobacco products, etc. When experienced at too young of an age, it is destructive.

 

What it boils down to for me, is this:

>Children cannot protect themselves and therefore society is responsible for doing it for them

>This person has obvious psychological issues that noone fully understands - and is a liability - to what degree we are not certain

>Therefore, this person should not be around children in a school atmosphere. The parents of these children have expressed this point of view as well. As parents of these children, their wishes should be respected.

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>This person has obvious psychological issues that noone fully understands - and is a liability - to what degree we are not certain
Post-op transsexuals are a liability? In what way? Do you have any figures on that? What do you expect to happen? You'd think all the female hormones would make them less aggressive than they were before, rather than more, for example.

 

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